Tag Archives: kids theatre

Argy Barge!!!

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We (the other 9-12 YO kids and I at the Argy Barge workshop at the Roola Boola festival) started off with a fresh canvas! No – one had pre – planned our storyline. We  got to make it up ourselves.

We started  off by playing some fun acting  games to help us get used to what we would be doing over the next 4 hours.

After we had finished up with the games (and when I had finished failing miserably), we started pouring out our ideas up onto the white board. We came up with many random, crazy, impossible – in – real – life ideas. We made sure that our story was weird, funny, wacky, impossible – in – real – life  and most off all … RANDOM! We had meerkats, an assassin that killed people with a blunt pencil, lactose – intolerance free cheesecake, Fartenstein ( yes, I spelt that right!!! )  and a twist … sort – of.

We used all kinds of acting! We used puppets, ourselves as the actors, shadow puppetry and lighting effects!

We put on the performance for our families afterwards and you can see a sample of the enthusiastic response in the video below.  My mum and brother enjoyed the show.

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Hannah with theatre director of Argy Barge – Anthony Crowley

Also here is a sample of a production from the workshop.

Finius Flume and the Fabulous Fandangle Factory

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I went to see this at the La Mama Courthouse Theatre on the 28th September 2011.

Finius Flume works long, looong, loooong hours at the Fandangle Factory. His job is to make sure all the fandangles are in perfect condition for giving out to the public. The fandangles were fun though and he wanted to play with them but when he tried a foreman would always come and interrupt his play, bossing him to get back to work!

I thought that the show was lively with VERY creative props, lots of comedy, some puppets, zany machines, stilt walking and more.

Recommended age: 3 to 7 years.

Here are some pics:

Finius & the Foreman

A funny chase - watchout Finius!

The bubble fandangle.

Photos provided by La Mama Courthouse Theatre  – Photographer Daisy Noyes.

Stay tuned… I will be adding my own fandangle inspired by the show – here later.

Still Awake, STILL!

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I attended this play on 29th September 2011 at The Arts Centre in Melbourne.

It is based on a book by Elizabeth Honey but quite different from it.

A lady named Miss Tinklefinger has a tough time trying to put the audience to sleep. She tries singing lullabies and playing the piano, and other things too. Two strange characters keep hopping out of the top of the piano, at the most unexpected times to make things interesting.

The show is full of surprises, humour, wonder and different musical styles.

Here is my poem about it:

I‘m still awake, still!

Madam sings a lullaby


Still, I’m awake though

Then she plays the piano

I‘m still awake,

Laughing and dancing and prancing!

Lullabies won’t put me to sleep,


And neither will the soft sound of a piano

Well, Madam couldn’t take any more of this,

And with that, she found a way to …

KEEP US ASLEEP!

END! 🙂


I think it was creative, but I do also think that it may have been more suitable for children a couple of years younger
than me. Also I would have enjoyed it a little more if there were more characters.

Recommended age: 3-7 years old.

Some Pics:

Miss Tinklefinger

Photos provided by the artist/The Arts Centre

It’s Not Circus It’s Science

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I saw this with my brother Josh and mum at the Northcote Kids Festival on the 28th September 2011. It was a kid’s theatre show put on by the duo Barnard and Wild of Teacup Tumble Theatre.

The play was about a very distinguished scientist-Professor Barnard, and a very clumsy scientist-Professor Wild. It is a play with acrobatics, lots of clowning around, whips and brain science. Professor Wild is the wildest scientist I have ever, ever, ever, ever encountered! However Professor Barnard is one of the stereotypical scientists – serious and smart. They try to work together on their experiments but their methods clash. The show was a real explosion of characters! There was also a sub-character- The Battery!!!

My favourite part was when mum and I got to go up on stage, to prove their scientific hypothesis that you ‘learn something better when it is harder to read’. I held up a sheet of paper with a lot of big scientific words on it and moved it around while mum had to read it like an acrobat standing on the professors’ thighs. Mum said she had fun being an acrobat but reading the words was not that hard, just confusing.

Interview with Josh (my brother):

Q. What did you think of the show?

A. It was funny, it was interesting and it was scary.

Q. Why was it scary?

A. Because of the whips- they were very loud!

Q .Which was your favourite scientist?

A. Professor Wild.

Q. Why was she your favourite?

A. Because she was funny- very funny.

Q. Would you have wanted to go on stage like I did?

A. No.

Q. Why?

A. Because I would feel scared.

Q. What part of the scientists’ outfits were your favourite?

A. That is a weird question.

Q. Well?

A. I’d have to say the glasses.

We all really enjoyed the show and hope maybe they get to do this show at Scienceworks and ArtPlay sometime so many others can see it too.

Recommended age: 5yrs+

From left to right: The Professors Barnard and Wild

The "wild" Professor Wild.

Above pictures provided by Professor A.Wild.

For more info see Teacup Tumble Theatre.

My artwork inspired by the show – created in Kid Pix Deluxe 4:

Crazy scientists in their lab

 

Splash

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This was run by Little Big Shots artists Ben Landau and Ben Goodes at ArtPlay.

I went to this workshop with Josh, my brother on 12th June 2011. Other children also attended with us.

We did a stop motion film where we got to plan the story ourselves, and we got to choose our characters to play. Also we chose our own costumes from what was set out for us. Josh was a villainous shark, I and two other girls were mermaids and two other boys were eels. While we were doing the story, photographs were taken from above to create the film while we were asked to keep still every few secs.

It was enjoyable but I did find it a little difficult to keep perfectly still.

Recommended age: 5 – 12yrs (have to be able to follow directions fairly well and keep still when asked).

The “villainous” shark –trying to be scary.

Below is a link to a you tube video by the artists in which my brother and I appear – somewhere…see if you can find us 🙂

 

Salt Bush

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This was an Australian and Italian production created by Compagnia TPO.

I attended this on Saturday 2nd April 2011 at ArtPlay.  This was my second time attending this performance.

It involved special lighting effects featuring beautiful Aboriginal paintings on a carpet and dancers performed to it in time along with expressive music and sound effects while telling a story.

It was also very interactive as audience members were invited to join in at different times.

My favourite part was when there was a big blue butterfly, which looked like it was being controlled by the actors as they moved their hands around.

I also liked it when I was called onto the carpet to dance.  I felt nervous when I went up there but I didn’t feel so nervous when Tager joined me.  Tager and I danced on Lily pads and we went under a sheet that had projected stars on it.  It was all fun, dancing.

To me, Salt Bush means ….

A U S T R A L I A   and U S – we’re all from different places, but have this great land in common. 🙂

I recommend people go to see this at ArtPlay– school groups can attend also.  Best for ages 5yrs+ as there is a small educational talk as well at the start about Aboriginal history.

Me (in pink top) with cast and crew of Salt Bush and my ArtPlay friends