Category Archives: Exhibitions

Melbourne Writers Festival – Bookwallah Exhibition

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Bookwallah Exhibition

From the  photo you can see it was a display of books and suitcases.

It is a collaboration between travelling writers from India and Australia where many books have been donated from Australia to India via a travelling library exhibition.  Authors could have charged money for all the books, but they donated them to India for free!

It is a great concept as people in India can then access these Australian books – some about Australia – which are hard to get in India. At the exhibition there were also books from India. This helps in understanding different cultures.

You can find more information at http://www.thebookwallah.com/

Went to this at the State Library VIC on 24th August 2013.

Paint What You Hear

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It was an Exhibition on 2nd October 2012
Run by lead artist Erica Rasmussen at ArtPlay.
There was also a band performance.

IT was a simple yet fun exhibition.  All we had to do, is paint along to the music.

Say, if it was sweet, smooth classical music, you paint a stroke something like this:

smooth brush stroke - paint what you hear

Or if it was crazy, full-on heavy metal, you would paint this:

statacato prush movement - paint what you hear

or if it was something in-between, you would paint a brush stroke like so:

inbetween brush stroke - paint what you hear!!!

Here are a few pictures from the paint what you hear exhibition:

Paint What You Hear  Exhibition Painting

A painting from the “Paint What You Hear” Exhibition

IMG_0368 Joshua's

Making our own paintings via ‘’hearing what we paint’’.

IMG_0373 Rock band

The Band

IMG_0375-Joshua and Mum's

Mum and Joshua’s Painting

IMG_0376 Hannah's

Hannah’s “Paint What You Hear” Painting

IMG_0378 Hannah at work

Here I am, Hannah at Work

IMG_0379 Hannah's

Hannah’s finished work “Blobs”.

Game Masters Exhibition

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(logo from ACMI Game Masters Page)

There were lots of retro games such as Donkey Kong.

Also some new games.

I played a new “Sonic” 3D game with my brother. It was fun.

I had a go at a game called “Child of Eden” designed by Tetsuya Mizuguchi.

According to Good Game at ABC 3 “Child of Eden is based on the concept of Synaesthesia,

a rare medical condition where people actually see colours from sounds,

tastes and even letters and numbers”.

It had amazing artwork and music.

I went to this in September 2012, at ACMI Melbourne, with my family.

The Lady and The Unicorn exhibition and Weaving a Myth workshop

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The meeting of poetry and tapestry!

I went to an exhibition “The Lady and the Unicorn” with Etchings by Melbourne artist Arthur Boyd based on interpretations of the words of poet Peter Porter on 13th July 2012. The poems are based on a historical fiction novel about French tapestries featuring a beautiful lady and a unicorn. It is about a love story and mythical tale about a lady and a unicorn who love each other but find it hard to be together. This exhibition comes from NSW – The Bundanon Trust.

The story was explained (kid’s version poetry) by artist and Bundanon Trust Education Manager – Mary Preece.

Arthur Boyd’s art from activity booklet from Bundanon Trust.

Mum found it interesting that there was a picture incorporating Noah’s Ark as well into the poetry of the story.

I also did an activity booklet provided to learn about the story, see my pictures below.

The trapped unicorn in a cage.

However, in the end in this poetry version they do go to heaven and are together for eternity.

This is my interpretation of some of the story – my poem.

The Lady and the Unicorn

 

There once was a unicorn,

With a glamorous horn,

With an enemy king,

Who was really thinking,

how to catch the animal for his zoo..

The unicorn fell in love,

With a lady wearing white like a dove,

But the unicorn was betrayed,

On a very, very fateful day,

By the lady.

At the lady’s wedding,

She found herself weeping,

For the unicorn was gone forever,

But the unicorn came back,

And they went to heaven together.

And they lived there for eternity

I also went to the workshop run by Mary Preece – “Weaving a Myth” – where I weaved some beautiful artwork. A tapestry to be precise – see pictures below.

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It was a challenge for me trying to find the right ribbon and right side of the fabric, and to place them in an interesting way in the frame. I enjoyed the weaving because when I finished my work it looked fantastic!!

Recommended age: 9-12yrs.

The Art Of The Brick

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The Art Of The Brick

I went with my family to this exhibition of Lego Art on the 24th of September 2011. It was by Nathan Sawaya – former lawyer turned Lego Artist.

We saw some impressive sculptures and portraits made of Lego bricks. Quite a few of these were based on “The Thinker” sculpture originally made by the artist Auguste Rodin – showing a man deep in thought. Other sculptures included fruit, weather, animals and people. One interesting sculpture was of a man falling off the edge of a building.

There was also a fabulous Lego construction of the City of Melbourne done by the Melbourne Lego User Group (MUG) – featuring some well known landmarks.

After we saw the gallery of Nathan’s Lego art we were inspired to do some Lego art ourselves downstairs.

Here are some pics:

Melbourne Lego User Group – City of Melbourne Sculpture

Melbourne Lego User Group – Flinders St Station

My favourite one was this globe.

My brother Josh – as a Lego Ninjago. "Why did you put your hand in there Josh?"^^

Mum's version of "The Thinker". Very colourful!

Dad's version of "The Thinker". He must be working out while thinking – so like Dad!

Mum's Lego Landscape "3 Tree Island".

Joshua's Donut Tower.

This exhibition is touring around the world. You can see more of Nathan’s work at http://www.brickartist.com

Cardboard Play Spaces

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This was an exhibition by first year architecture students from Monash University.

I went to this on Sun 29th May 2011 with my mum and brother.

It was house-like things made from cardboard that you could go inside, just like big cubby houses.

Recommended age: All ages but best for kids.

This one was my favourite because there were many little rooms.